Contributor to MTV Iggy, eMusic, Nylon, Filter, Relevant, Under the Radar, Paste, and more. Not Hip. Likes catsup and pie. Great. Now we have nothing left to discuss on the second date.

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IT MIGHT BE HARD TO BELIEVE, but Pharrell Williams is 41 years old. In both quantity and quality, the musician’s CV reads like someone’s twice his age. There are the production gigs. (Among his credits is work for Britney Spears, Snoop Dogg, Justin Timberlake, Johnny Marr and Robin Thicke.) There’s time spent as a member of The Neptunes and N.E.R.D. There’s his solo work. Even as a guest musician he has the knack of landing once-in-a-lifetime spots. (Perhaps you’ve heard Daft Punk’s ubiquitous single “Get Lucky”?) (via FILTER Magazine)

IT MIGHT BE HARD TO BELIEVE, but Pharrell Williams is 41 years old. In both quantity and quality, the musician’s CV reads like someone’s twice his age. There are the production gigs. (Among his credits is work for Britney Spears, Snoop Dogg, Justin Timberlake, Johnny Marr and Robin Thicke.) There’s time spent as a member of The Neptunes and N.E.R.D. There’s his solo work. Even as a guest musician he has the knack of landing once-in-a-lifetime spots. (Perhaps you’ve heard Daft Punk’s ubiquitous single “Get Lucky”?) (via FILTER Magazine)

Two albums deep with pop outfit Chairlift, Caroline Polachek has become one of pop’s go-to girls for upping a song’s seductive power. (See her work with Washed Out, Delorean, and Blood Orange.) Polachek’s first solo album under the enigmatic name Ramona Lisa isn’t a complete reinvention, as we’ve been led to believe, but rather a subtle recasting of the elements that make her such a powerful musical force. (via Ramona Lisa: Arcadia (Terrible) Review | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Two albums deep with pop outfit Chairlift, Caroline Polachek has become one of pop’s go-to girls for upping a song’s seductive power. (See her work with Washed Out, Delorean, and Blood Orange.) Polachek’s first solo album under the enigmatic name Ramona Lisa isn’t a complete reinvention, as we’ve been led to believe, but rather a subtle recasting of the elements that make her such a powerful musical force. (via Ramona Lisa: Arcadia (Terrible) Review | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Your grandfather would say that Lucy Love has gumption. Author Jane Austen would have described the Danish MC as plucky. But for us, Love is (and will always be) a musical spitfire. (via Lucy Love Brings Art to the Street | MTV IGGY)

Your grandfather would say that Lucy Love has gumption. Author Jane Austen would have described the Danish MC as plucky. But for us, Love is (and will always be) a musical spitfire. (via Lucy Love Brings Art to the Street | MTV IGGY)

The topic of celebrity crushes comes up more than I’d like to admit. (Because I’m single? Because I work in entertainment journalism? Because this is actually a thing that people talk about?) Every single time the subject is broached, I disappoint the asker by name-checking a musician. And usually a semi-obscure one at that. I mean, sure, if I have my wits about me, I’ll name Adrian Brody or maybe one of the guys from The Hunger Games. (Er… the one with the hair and accent?) But in all honesty, my choices lack conviction. All my crushes (real and celebrity) are intellectually based. Without more personal information than what the occasional red carpet interview offers, I worry that sooner or later he’d let out a stupid laugh or forget to take out the trash, and suddenly I’d be very confused as to why I wasn’t with whatever cinematic Mr. Perfect he was playing in his last blockbuster. Give me Jens Lekman in all his brokenhearted pop glory, and you can keep your Brad Pitt—or whomever it is I’m supposed to be losing my mind over these days. (via Truth vs. Celebrity: How Do We Separate the Artist from the Art? | Consequence of Sound)

The topic of celebrity crushes comes up more than I’d like to admit. (Because I’m single? Because I work in entertainment journalism? Because this is actually a thing that people talk about?) Every single time the subject is broached, I disappoint the asker by name-checking a musician. And usually a semi-obscure one at that. I mean, sure, if I have my wits about me, I’ll name Adrian Brody or maybe one of the guys from The Hunger Games. (Er… the one with the hair and accent?) But in all honesty, my choices lack conviction. All my crushes (real and celebrity) are intellectually based. Without more personal information than what the occasional red carpet interview offers, I worry that sooner or later he’d let out a stupid laugh or forget to take out the trash, and suddenly I’d be very confused as to why I wasn’t with whatever cinematic Mr. Perfect he was playing in his last blockbuster. Give me Jens Lekman in all his brokenhearted pop glory, and you can keep your Brad Pitt—or whomever it is I’m supposed to be losing my mind over these days. (via Truth vs. Celebrity: How Do We Separate the Artist from the Art? | Consequence of Sound)

“On record I will say whatever,” says Erika M. Anderson (better known by her initials EMA). “That’s what I need to do; that’s what helps me feel better. But in real life, I’m a Scandinavian, stoic, air sign. I’m not demonstrative emotionally in person. So it will really stay down inside. I found that music is a really great way to let things out.” (via EMA: Keep ‘Em Guessing :: Music :: Features :: Paste)

“On record I will say whatever,” says Erika M. Anderson (better known by her initials EMA). “That’s what I need to do; that’s what helps me feel better. But in real life, I’m a Scandinavian, stoic, air sign. I’m not demonstrative emotionally in person. So it will really stay down inside. I found that music is a really great way to let things out.” (via EMA: Keep ‘Em Guessing :: Music :: Features :: Paste)

Highasakite’s debut full-length Silent Treatment is populated by an extensive cast of colorful characters with painful stories — from low-grade delinquents (“Since Last Wednesday”), to abusive lovers (“Leaving No Traces”), to a digger attempting to make it all the way to Japan (“Hiroshima”), to any number of broken hearts (all of the above). (via Highasakite, ‘Silent Treatment’ Review | Wondering Sound)

Highasakite’s debut full-length Silent Treatment is populated by an extensive cast of colorful characters with painful stories — from low-grade delinquents (“Since Last Wednesday”), to abusive lovers (“Leaving No Traces”), to a digger attempting to make it all the way to Japan (“Hiroshima”), to any number of broken hearts (all of the above). (via Highasakite, ‘Silent Treatment’ Review | Wondering Sound)

As a child, Swedish singer-songwriter Karin Park made herself a promise — to never take a “normal” job. Having used music as a way to cope while adjusting to a move back home after living in Japan for three years, Park says the idea of doing anything else with her life never occurred to her. (via Karin Park Makes Art Her Life | MTV IGGY)

As a child, Swedish singer-songwriter Karin Park made herself a promise — to never take a “normal” job. Having used music as a way to cope while adjusting to a move back home after living in Japan for three years, Park says the idea of doing anything else with her life never occurred to her. (via Karin Park Makes Art Her Life | MTV IGGY)

It is almost obligatory to mention S. Carey in the same breath as his Bon Iver bandmate Justin Vernon. (Read More)

It is almost obligatory to mention S. Carey in the same breath as his Bon Iver bandmate Justin Vernon. (Read More)